Skip to Content
Show Bar Presents

Pillow Queens

  October 2, 2024 8:00 PM

Doors Open: 7:00 PM
TICKET PRICES CURRENTLY AVAILABLE
GENERAL ADMISSION 21+: $18.00

TICKET SALE DATES
GENERAL ADMISSION 21+ Public Onsale: July 12, 2024 10:00 AM to October 2, 2024 12:00 AM
Please note, when selecting the Print at Home or Mobile Delivery method, you will not have access to view your tickets until 3 days prior to the performance
 
 

There comes a point when every band finds themselves in a new place on the horizon. The precocious snarls of youth gone, the invincibility of being new – and Pillow Queens have been one of the most acclaimed new bands in recent years - now replaced by something else. A feeling of being unburdened and unafraid, of dropping the ballast of what other people might think. This is not to suggest a band who have softened, or rejected the music that made their name, if anything the new material places them in another realm, open to seriousness and vulnerability. The band’s timeline runs parallel to huge social and cultural change in Ireland, and queerness and Irish identity have always underpinned the songs. There hadn’t, in short, been a band quite like them before in Ireland.

An unlikely touchstone for this record was ‘Atlantis’, a poem by Irish poet Eavan Boland. Amid a swell of language, the poet searches for a specific word; “to convey that what is gone is gone forever and never found.” This quest defines the intense experiences that run through this extraordinary album. It’s there in each pocket of heartbreak, every hazy chorus of loss. The songs are a map of hurt and longing, of second-guessing and desire, the title of the record - Name Your Sorrow – is based on a line from the poem. The band believe it’s a more “blatant” album emotionally; not that they haven’t been this truthful before. But there was always metaphor to fall back on, oscillations of noise to hide behind. Name Your Sorrow is a more exposed record: no masks, no obliqueness, just a raw, open landscape of feeling. “You don’t have to scratch the surface too much to see what these songs are about”, offers Pamela Connolly. Sarah Corcoran likens it to physical experiences that are painful up to a point, but then “you get used to the pain and it has a positive inward effect.”

Three albums in three years indicates a serious work ethic, for Name Your Sorrow they stuck to a strict schedule. Cathy McGuinness explains that they showed up every day from 9-5, in a windowless Dublin room to just play, swap instruments and experiment. From there, they decamped to a rural Co. Clare retreat to immerse themselves further. “We got on this very non-verbal kind of wavelength, where you just kind of picked up your instruments. It was very instinctive and the most communal experience we’d ever had of working.”

 

 

THIS EVENT IS 21+ AND GENERAL ADMISSION. NO MINORS.

ALL SALES ARE FINAL. PLEASE, DOUBLE CHECK YOUR ORDER BEFORE PURCHASING. NO REFUNDS.
Number of Tickets
Limit 8 tickets per order.


* Does not include convenience or handling fees.