PERFORMANCE DESCRIPTION
In light of the ongoing COVID-19 virus situation, Cary Memorial Hall has officially been closed by the Town of Lexington. Due to this closure, Rickie Lee Jones, originally scheduled for Friday, May 22, and later rescheduled for Thursday, October 8, has been cancelled. This event will not be rescheduled. All tickets purchased via credit card will automatically be refunded.
By the time she was 19, JONES was living in Los Angeles, waiting tables and occasionally playing music in out of the way coffee houses and bars. All the while, she was developing her unique aesthetic: music that was sometimes spoken, often beautifully sung, and while emotionally accessible, she was writing lyrics as taut and complex as any by the great American poet, Elizabeth Bishop. In JONES' voice and songs, we saw smoky stocking seams, love being everything but requited. And it was during these years that RICKIE LEE's song, "Easy Money," caught the attention of one musician and then the music industry. The song was recorded by Lowell George, the founder of the band, Little Feat. He used it on his solo album, Thanks, I'll Eat It Here. Shortly thereafter, Warner Brothers auditioned JONES and quickly signed her to the label.

Her 1979 debut RICKIE LEE JONES (Warner Bros) won the Grammy for "Best New Artist." She was hailed by one critic as a "highly touted new pop-jazz-singer-songwriter" and another critic as "one of the best--if not the best--artist of her generation." In addition to the album's brilliant songs--including the exceptional "On Saturday Afternoons in 1963," the haunting "Last Chance Texaco," and the popular "Chuck E's in Love"--JONES was becoming a figure whose life was bearing a great deal of emulation by young women and men who found, in her deep and personal and idiosyncratic life and work, a model for the new generation of hipster.

Limited VIP seating available at https://www.rickieleejones.com/


All sales are final. No request for cancellations, exchanges, changes or refunds shall be honored.